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The Annoying Songs You Shouldn''t Play at Your Wedding

Дата публикации: 2017-10-11 10:04

This list from the data-driven folks at FiveThirtyEight is filled with the usual suspects, and compiled based on common do-not-play requests given to wedding DJs. Tacky tunes you’d expect to hear, like “YMCA,” “Macarena,” and “Cottoneye Joe.” If there’s a stupid dance for the song that somehow compels everyone to do it through drunken peer pressure, it’s on there. There are a few you might not expect, however. “Happy” by Pharrell Williams, for example, is on my personal do-not-play list, but I didn’t expect to see it here. Here are the top 75 most banned wedding songs:

How to Keep Your Social Media Creeping Private - Lifehacker

Twitter used to be the hardest search history to clear, but now it’s a piece of why-did-I-search-every-possible-spelling-of-my-own-name cake. When you click the Twitter search bar, you get offered “Recent Searches.” But at the same time, you’re offered the option to clear this out, with an X or “Clear All.” Smash that button, and you’ll have a clean slate.

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No shame on the game, Armie, but not all of us have your chill bravado. So here’s a guide to keeping your social media search habits to yourself.

You probably think you know how to keep your internet habits secret. “Clearing browser history is too obvious,” you say. “I just do all my sketchy stuff in an incognito window!” Okay, hot stuff, then let me ask you this: You ever search anything weird on Instagram? Got any visits to an ex’s Twitter profile that you might not want to share with the next friend or loved one who grabs your phone? “I’ve gotta show you this adorable Japanese puppy’s account. Why do your recent searches look like Armie Hammer’s ?”

Finally, you can tweak your Explore feed by choosing “See Fewer Posts Like This”—when you see the kind of account you want to downplay, click the three dots in the upper left for the option to appear.

Come on, who is playing the “Hokey Pokey” at their wedding? Stop it. Whether you’re getting ready to get hitched, want your friend or family member to avoid a cheesy reception, or you’re a DJ yourself, take note. You can check out FiveThirtyEight’s full list of nearly 55 banned songs here.

Instagram search habits can make themselves known in two ways: First, they contribute to your “explore” feed, Instagram’s offerings of posts you might like, which appears when you click the magnifying lens on the bottom navigation bar. Then, once you click into the search bar on the top of that page, Instagram offers more suggestions and offers your recent searches.

Click on the Facebook search bar and, yup, there are your recent searches. So helpful, Facebook! Luckily, as InformationWeek points out , you can clear your Facebook search history wholesale or remove individual items. But be forewarned: You’re about to see not just a collection of your top search terms, but every individual search you’ve made on Facebook. If you’ve been doing some compulsive social media sleuthing, this may be your come-to-Jesus.

The Next Web has a full run-down for erasing these red flags. Clearing your search history is step one—it’ll clear your recent searches but won’t affect recommendations. You can do this from Settings. (On iOS click the gear icon next to “edit profile.” On Android it’s the three-dot line.)

To stop an account from showing up in your search recommendations—Instagram might know what you like but you don’t need anyone else to know it!—click the search bar, and then click and hold the account—you’ll get a pop-up option to hide. (The hiding is permanent, no matter how many times you continue to search for the account.)